Bizet
Carmen – Opera in four Acts to a libretto by Henri Meilhac & Ludovic Halévy based on a novella by Prosper Mérimée [sung in French, recitatives by Ernest Guiraud, with English Met titles by Sonya Friedman]

Carmen – Clémentine Margaine
Don José – Rafael Davila
Micaëla – Maria Agresta
Escamillo – Kyle Ketelsen
Zuniga – Nicolas Testé
Moralès – John Moore
Frasquita – Danielle Talamantes
Mercédès – Shirin Eskandani
Le Remendado – Eduardo Valdes
Le Dancaïre – Malcolm MacKenzie

Maria Kowrosk & Martin Harvey (dancers)

The Metropolitan Opera Chorus

Orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera
Asher Fisch

Sir Richard Eyre – Production
Rob Howell – Set & Costume Designer
Peter Mumford – Lighting Designer
Christopher Wheeldon – Choreographer
Jonathon Loy – Revival Stage Director

The Metropolitan Opera's production of Bizet's Carmen
Kyle Ketelsen as Escamillo
Photograph: Marty Sohl At Metropolitan Opera, Bizet’s Carmen has become a well-worn favorite; however, at this latest revival, even the debuts of Clémentine Margaine and Rafael Davila were not enough to make this a particularly memorable evening. Richard Eyre’s once-gritty production has faded into monotony as performers struggle to bring personal nuance into over-rehearsed gestures. Furthermore, despite refined playing in the entr’actes, Asher Fisch was not able to keep the Met Orchestra from lapsing into routine.

Replacing an ailing Sophie Koch, Margaine used her waxy penetrating timbre, husky middle voice, and cutting high notes to seduce the man around her. Her vocals are more dramatic than beautiful, at times becoming stylized and sensually bending her pitch. Still, she must be commended for throwing herself bodily into her portrayal, at times singing while held aloft by dancers or being dragged across the stage during the violent final encounter with Don José.

The Metropolitan Opera's production of Bizet's Carmen
Rafael Davila as Don José and Clémentine Margaine as Carmen
Photograph: Marty Sohl Davila, a last-minute substitute for Marcelo Álvarez, sang Don José with a dark and burnished timbre, his top notes bright and secure, but he could be heard shifting abruptly between vocal registers, and he essayed the role with little emotional connection.

Kyle Ketelsen’s ruggedly handsome Escamillo exuded confidence with a robust and alluring tone. Don José had no chance against the toreador’s self-assured sex-appeal. To Micaëla Maria Agrest brought a plush, rounded sound and a polished rendition of the character’s moving Act Three aria.

As Frasquita and Mercédès respectively, Shirin Eskandani and Danielle Talamantes made much of their appearances, and with winning enthusiasm, whereas Nicolas Testé was a rigid Zuniga and Eduardo Valdes and Malcolm MacKenzie were passable in their roles. There are always Bizet’s tunes to salvage things.

 

© 1999 - 2017 www.classicalsource.com Limited. All Rights Reserved