Published: May 2019

June may well be about to bust-out – but I am in minimalist mode (fine for words, less good for music!). Rather than reveal three-of-the-best recordings of those that Classical Source reviewed during May, it’s Lucky Seven (I've got to stop somewhere, if with pangs of regret for what is not included).

So, in no particular order (if with links below being strictly alphabetical) I was bowled-over at the quality of Jean Louis Nicodé’s piano music (if you like Schumann...) – a feather or two in the cap of Simon Callaghan and Hyperion for this one; similarly for that label and Steven Osborne in Beethoven’s Opuses 109-111, stellar readings of core/competitive repertoire. Equally distinguished is Augustin Hadelich’s vibrant account of further staple/oft-recorded music, Brahms’s Violin Concerto, coupled with Ligeti’s compelling example.

Do keep an eye (and ear) out for pianist Gaspard Dehaene – very talented – and, gratifyingly, a few of my musical hang-ups have finally been laid to rest: Josef Suk’s Asrael Symphony (Jiří Bělohlávek), Berlioz’s L’Enfance du Christ (Andrew Davis) and Britten’s Three String Quartets (Doric SQ).

PS: if you happen to read this late on May 30 or anytime on May 31, don’t worry, it is that date; I posted early!

All best and bustin'-all-over wishes (musical and otherwise) to you all for June.

Colin Anderson
Editor
The Classical Source
1 June 2019

***As a postscript, just to clarify how Classical Source uses stars for its reviews. Since April 2016 a star-rating is mandatory for anything generally available (a recording, a book...) and when there is a run of performances (an opera, a ballet...). Stars are not required for a concert unless a reviewer is of the opinion that something is exceptional (five stars) or quite the opposite (one); either is rare ... ultimately it is the words that matter.***

 

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